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Free Lunch Society

Free Lunch Society

Christian Tod, 92 min

Austria, Germany, 2016

Free Lunch Society

Guaranteed basic income  yes or no? A surprising and thought-provoking film about a radical idea, which is back on the top of the social agenda.

Would you work if you were paid for simply existing? The guaranteed basic income is back as an alternative to the principle of rights and duties, and to a bureaucratic economic system. At least it's back in the public debate, and the idea that everyone over the age of 21 should have a fixed monthly allowance, regardless of whether they are working or not, really divides opinions. But not along the lines of traditional political dichotomies. Neo-conservative economists, utraliberals and socialists are all in favour, while everyone else is strongly against. Politics and economics meet pyschology and philosophical questions about human nature. Will it make people lazy? Or will it free them? And what about the robots, who in the very near future will actually make most jobs redundant? 'Free Lunch Society' takes a highly topical and radical idea up for debate in a surprising and thought-provoking film, and gives the floor to some of the people who have the most thought-through opinions about it. From Nobel Prize winning economists to those who believe that a basic income will finally free man from the hamster wheel of capitalism and let us fulfil our potential.

Screenings

Date Time Location

Mon. 20/03

18:30

Bremen Teater
Q&A with director and debate

Tickets

Fri. 24/03

16:30

Nordisk Film Palads
Meet the director

Tickets

Sat. 25/03

15:30

Indre By Kulturhus
With debate

Tickets

World Premiere
Director: Christian Tod
Original Title: Free Lunch Society
Country: Austria, Germany
Year: 2016
Running time: 92 min
Tags: Special Screenings Politikens Publikumspris Politics
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Producer: Golden Girls film , Arash T. Riahi, Karin C. Berger
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