Tuesday, March 27

17:00

Milford Graves

Heart beats, polyrhythms and vibrations from outer space. Welcome to the free jazz legend Milford Graves’s creative cosmos in South Jamaica, New York.

Vester Vov Vov

New York is the centre of the universe. Because it is here – in a house decorated with mosaics and a garden full of plants from all over the world – that the American percussionist and free jazz legend Milford Graves has his earthly home. A formidable gentleman and a creative genius, whose own heart rhythm together with the cyclical cosmology of nature has determined the rhythm of his life since the 1960s. Graves has dedicated his existence to being able to express himself through his music. But his kaleidoscopic creativity is also reflected in his life philosophy and his own invention Yara, a martial art inspired by African dance. It is the deep, human ties to nature that still inspire Graves to turn recordings of his own, beating heart into electronic music. But through clips from throughout his over 50-year-long career, we are reminded of how big an influence Graves has been on everyone who tried to set music free. Welcome all the way into a world of polyrhythms, heartbeats and vibrations from outer space.

17:00

Grace Jones

Pull up to the bumper, baby! 10 years in the life of the ultimate diva – as singer, supermodel, style-icon and as the human being behind the superstar.

Empire Bio

If Grace Jones did not exist, somebody would have to invent her. One of the greatest style icons of our times who since the 1980s has reigned supreme as both a singer and a supermodel – and who still lets it all out like she was 22, even though she is turning 70 this year. But who is the person behind the mask of makeup? Sophie Fiennes has followed ‘Amazing Grace’ for 10 entire years (!), and created a close and personal portrait of the uncompromising singer, who today is both a mother and a grandmother. A visit to her family in Jamaica shows a completely unexpected and loving side of Jones, when she is not in the limelight or travelling around the world to hang out with friends and former lovers. With her iconic hits such as ‘Slave to the Rhythm’ and ‘Pull Up to the Bumper’ under her belt, Jones can still be hard to match on stage. Which she also proves here, in a spectacular live show made especially for the film.

17:30

Beautiful Things

Documentary science fiction from a future we already live in without knowing it.

Cinemateket

If documentary science fiction was a genre – and it is now! – then ‘Beautiful Things’ is the film that locates the future in the midst of our present age. A machine engineer on a supertanker and a scientist specialising in mathematics and audio studies are two of the human cogs in a bulimic cycle of (over)production and (over)consumption of the material objects that surround us – a cycle we never even think about. A chain with many segments, which the filmmaker duo of Giorgio Ferreroand Federico Biasin brings together in an accomplished audiovisual study of our times, but with room for the human quirks that constitute the grit in the machinery. Like modern monks, Danilo, Andrea and Vito work on their own in vast, industrial temples to create the basis for the comfort that most people take for granted. Work and alienation: Two things that have taken on a whole new meaning in the 21st century’s fundamentally changing and increasingly abstract networks of economics, ecology and (un)natural raw materials. A film, which is both conceived and created with the big picture in mind.

19:00

Of Father and Sons

Born as a warrior? Martyr dreams as a goodnight story in a both shocking and deeply human film about family life as an ISIS warrior in Syria.

Cinemateket

Two men are relaxing in a sparsely decorated room after a long day in the battlefield. A group of young boys run around noisily and laugh, like 10-year-olds do. The difference is just that these boys are the sons of ISIS warriors who are lounging about in the room. Their goodnight stories consist of tales from the war and about martyrs, who have sacrificed themselves as suicide bombers. When the goodnight stories are finished, their fathers kiss and hug them and say ‘I love you’ before the lights are turned off. The boys want to be like their fathers, and several of them are named after what most people would call terrorists, but who are considered heroes here. Syrian filmmaker Talal Derki has lived over two years with the ISIS warrior Abu Osama’s family, and his both shocking and deeply human ‘Of Fathers and Sons’ gives us a unique look at the surprising tenderness that hides under the feared black flag of the Islamic State of Syria. For even if you love death more than life, the love of your children is still greater than both taken together.

19:00

The Green Lie

Are we seduced by the good message of sustainability when we go shopping? A docu-comedy where nothing is what it seems.

Grand Teatret

What does organic, fair trade and sustainability really mean? Does the food industry keep what it promises, when you stand in a supermarket and have to make the right choice? And can you save the planet through the way you shop? A sceptical Werner Boote – Austria’s answer to Michael Moore – and his German colleague Kathrin Hartmann travel around the world to explore this topic. And reality often appears to be as far from the marketing promises as the consequences of ‘the green lie’ can be disastrous. From Bali to Brazil and to the office of Noam Chomsky: there is more at stake than money once the benevolent consumers are seduced by the good message. ‘The Green Lie’ is based on Kathrin Hartmann’s studies of the controversial phenomenon of ‘greenwashing’, where multinationals brand themselves as sustainable, while they simultaneously undermine the ecosystems of the countries in which they operate.

19:00

Ethiopiques

Local musical traditions meet Western rock n’ roll and soul, and fantastic music is the result in 1960s Ethiopia, where music was otherwise forbidden.

Vester Vov Vov

James Brown is shouting and screaming from the loudspeakers. People have gathered in front of the record store in Ethiopia’s capital Addis Ababa, and they are completely transfixed. When the day is over, all the records have been sold. In the 1960s, a visionary Ethiopian imported records from all over the world, and was the first person to produce Ethiopian music, even though it was forbidden by the government. The groovy, beat-driven and almost hypnotising soul-jazz music made its way into the listeners’ ears and hypnotised them. The film shows how people danced in the streets until the day when a coup threw the country into civil war, and musicians were forced to escape from Ethiopia together with their music. This could have been the end of Ethiopian music history, but as fate would have it, a record fell into the hands of a French music enthusiast, who gave the genre a bustling afterlife with the critically acclaimed 32-record album series ‘Ethiopiques’.

19:30

Welcome to Sodom

A dark and sensuous film from a landfill in Ghana, where electronic waste from the West is being recycled. An unforgettable experience, told by the workers themselves.

Empire Bio

Over 250,000 tons of electronic waste are shipped to Ghana each year to be recycled under almost apocalyptic conditions. Here, thousands of children and adults work on disassembling flat screens, telephones and laptops in the open air, in an artificial and endless landscape of trash, while others extract copper by melting old cables over an open fire. ‘Welcome to Sodom’ (which is the title of a rap song in the film) places us right in the middle of the location’s dark heart. But it is the voices of the workers that lead us around Sodom and choose the words – and the unexpected performative gestures – to describe a conditions that if infernal almost beyond description. The Austrian directing duo Florian Weigensamer and Christian Krönes have created a dark and sensuous film’, but one where the almost timeless vision of the apocalypse is followed by an extremely urgent call for action to the times we live in right now. An age where digital development promises us an increasingly comfortable and carefree life, while the internet’s illusion of being immaterial creates a blind angle for all of the West’s e-waste to be dumped.

21:30

The Cleaners

Editing or censorship? The debate in the internet’s underworld about Facebook and YouTube’s rights and duties as moderators is already raging.

Cinemateket

What responsibility do Facebook, Google and YouTube have for what is being posted on their sites? And what power do they have to shape the public discourse through censorship? Two questions that are currently preoccupying legislators and politicians. But who are the people who actually try to keep the internet clean? Meet five Filipino ‘content moderators’ who have the unrewarding job of keeping social media free from offensive content, but who also work full-time in a legal and ethical grey zone between freedom of expression, censorship and commercial interests. ‘The Cleaners’ brings us into the underworld of the internet, where the debates are already raging. 500 hours of video are uploaded to YouTube and 2.5 million posts created on Facebook. Every minute. Every day. And the media giants’ influence on everything from presidential elections to the number of likes for one’s status updates is now so enormous that legislation can no longer ignore it.

21:30

False Confessions

Trained interrogators can make innocent people confess to almost anything in the United States. A Danish lawyer works for justice in a hair-raising and cynical system.

Grand Teatret

During an interrogation in the United States, it is both legal and commonplace to use special psychological techniques to make the suspect confess. In a closed room, coached interrogators can not only get anyone to confess to anything – they can also make innocent people believe that they have actually committed crimes such as murder and child assault. In New York, the Danish-born defence attorney Jane Fisher-Byrialsen is working to prevent false confessions, so that less people end up in prison for crimes they have not committed. Through four of her cases, we meet those involved, the previously accused and the family members of those incarcerated. And through video footage from the interrogation room, which makes our hair stand on end, we experience what the suspects go through in terms of brutal, psychological manipulation by police officers who are more interested in maintaining their high success rate than in upholding justice. The mechanisms of the law become tangible as we meet Danish Malthe Thomsen who was acquitted of a baseless accusation. ‘False Confessions’ is a legal thriller about a pro-bono idealist’s work for justice in a cynical justice system.