Kunsthal Charlottenborg
20 – 24  March 2017

Presented in partnership with
Documentary Campus

Themes

Art, Technology & Change

At the intersection between art, technology & change we explore how are artists are embracing new tools to comment on the world and the post-human condition with rising political awareness and activism, how we interact, live and work with robots and artificial intelligence and what is ultimately revealed about ourself and our humanity.

Buy ticket!

← Monday

Tuesday →

Science & Film

It is now more than ever time to get closer to the facts. This conference day about science and film is your chance to understand how to communicate science and scientific research in a way that makes everyone feel that you care about the facts without losing your audience. Explore the special relationship between science and film and meet the makers in the field.

Buy ticket!

Serialized

Serialized storytelling has become a major part of the documentary landscape and a top priority for broadcasters and SVOD platforms. Lately titles like “The Jinx,” “Making a Murderer,” and “OJ: Made in America” have been on everybody’s lips and have had great success with the audience. We explore what the format offers filmmakers and meet those who have excelled in it.

Buy ticket!

← Wednesday

Thursday →

The Art of Impact

We are living in a “post truth” world, where the role of the documentary community, bringing forward powerful messages, has become more crucial than ever. Explore what it takes to craft impact strategies that ensure a film delivers real world accountability and be inspired to think big.

Buy ticket!

Art:Film

When even the highest powers refer to “alternative facts” – it seems that understanding of reality has already shifted. One has to question whether the nature of reality itself has actually changed? Join prominent artists and thinkers to discuss what role an artists and art can play in this context.

Buy ticket!

← Friday

Schedule

CPH:CONFERENCE

10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
13:00
13:30
14:00
14:30
15:00
15:30
16:00
16:30
17:00
17:30
18:00
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
13:00
13:30
14:00
14:30
15:00
15:30
16:00
16:30
17:00
17:30
18:00
Monday: Art, Tech, Change
Monday: Art, Tech, Change
Computer Says No
10:00 - 10:40
Computer Says No

Artificial intelligence (AI) now drives decision making processes for human resource departments, police forces and financial institutions. As technology advances, increased transparency and oversight is needed to evaluate and audit AI systems and their outcomes. In the pursuit of an algorithmic governance framework that is free of bias, should we look to the future or to the past?

Speaker: Matthew Stender, Tech Ethicist, Germany

Journalism in the 21st-Century
10:40 - 11:10
Journalism in the 21st-Century

What once was a newspaper now exists on paper, online, on mobile, and on a device strapped to your head. What is a newspaper now? How important is keeping up with technology to their future? And how does journalism change across different platforms? Including a projected preview VR walk-through of a brand-new film.

Speaker: Francesca Panetta, Executive Editor, Virtual Reality, Guardian, UK

Inside Syria’s Secret Prison
11:10 - 11:35
Inside Syria’s Secret Prison

Stories emerged in January, that 13.000 have secretly been hanged in Syria’s notorious prison, Saydnaya, a journalistic no-go-zone. Now ex-detainees have collaborated with Amnesty International and Forensic Architecture, a multidisciplinary team consisting of architects, scientists, artists and journalists, to build an accurate model of the prison based on 3D architectural modelling and ear-testimony to cast light in Syria’s hellish torture prison.

Speaker: Christina Varvia, Researcher & Project Coordinator, Forensic Architecture, UK

Fighting Back. Journalism and Activism in War
11:35 - 12:00
Fighting Back. Journalism and Activism in War

In a world where regimes are bombarding us with propaganda and alternative truths, how do journalists cover the stories as they unfold? Do we embrace the dark arts to fight back or strive not to be biased? We take a lesson from Nuba Reports in conflict-ridden Sudan where the government have banned any mention of the on-going conflict.

Speaker: Trevor Snapp, Journalist, Nuba Reports, Kenya

Augmented Reality Activism
12:00 - 12:30
Augmented Reality Activism

Ram Devinini will demonstrate how the low-tech art of comic books and street art, with high-tech interactivity of Augmented Reality has been used to confront the sensitive issue of gender-based violence in India, with a live demo of the AR experience that can also be seen in the exhibition at Charlottenborg.

Speaker: Ram Devineni, Producer/Director, Rattapallax, USA / India

The Enemy AR
12:30 - 13:00
The Enemy AR

What do you see, feel and experience placed between two enemies? In a break with usually portrayed war imagery, The Enemy uses augmented reality on a mobile device to offer insight and perspective into those who bear the violence of conflict internally. By projecting directly from the mobile device, the audience will see for themselves how AR allows them to speak, present themselves and expose their motivations and dreams.

Speaker: Paul George, Dpt., Canada

Lunch Break
13:00 - 14:00
Lunch Break

Can Artificial Intelligence Be Creative?
14:00 - 14:30
Can Artificial Intelligence Be Creative?

IBM’s Research & Development team created the trailer for the thriller Morgan by analyzing more than 100 horror film trailers. It shows how AI might be used in the creative industries and explores whether creativity can be analyzed and recreated methodically.

Speaker: John R Smith, IBM Fellow and Manager of Multimedia and Vision at IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, USA

...And on Drums We Have a Cyborg
14:30 - 15:00
...And on Drums We Have a Cyborg

Professor Gil Weinberg is the inventor of experimental musical instruments and autonomous musical robots that do real-time jazz improvisations, copy the great masters and suggests that we might be able to use robots to elevate ourselves and music to a different level.

Speaker: Gil Weinberg, Professor and Director at Georgia Tech Center for Music Technology, USA

How Do We Live With Robots?
15:00 - 15:30
How Do We Live With Robots?

As robots move from science fiction to daily reality, the drama of power and status in human-robot relations will begin to enter our everyday lives. We tend to focus on those who will be replaced by robots, but what effects will robots have on us as we start to live and work with them?

Speaker: David Sirkin, Research Engineer at Stanford University’s Center for Design Research, USA

Coffee Break
15:30 - 16:00
Coffee Break

Your Brain Is the Remote
16:00 - 16:30
Your Brain Is the Remote

How do we make use of the compelling advancements in tech and storytelling? RIOT unfold stories of a time of extreme global unrest through an emotionally responsive, live-action film with 3D sound, which uses facial recognition to navigate through a dangerous riot.

Speaker:
Karen Palmer, Director, IF Interactive Film, UK

Navigating by Instinct
16:30 - 16:45
Navigating by Instinct

Inspired by Freud, WHIST takes you into the unconscious mind, where your instincts guide you through a narrative of surreal dreams and fears. It merges Physical Theatre and Mixed Reality in an environment that blurs the boundaries between consciousness and unconsciousness, reality and fiction, physical and virtual.

Speaker: Esteban Fourmi, Director, Choreographer, AΦE, UK

Photo by: Liat

Theatrical VR: Rhizhomat
16:45 - 17:15
Theatrical VR: Rhizhomat

The Berliner Festspiele and ARTE are collaborating on a new theatrical VR experience exploring the zone between dystopia and utopia, between obedience and freedom. Learn how they created the world of Rhizomat.

Speaker: Mona El Gammal, Director, Berliner Festspiele, Germany

The Smartphone Orchestra
17:15 - 17:45
The Smartphone Orchestra

Our smart-phones command our attention even in social situations with friends and family, replacing genuine human interaction. But what if they can be used to unite us in a shared human experience?

Speaker: Eric Magnee, creative technologist of The Smartphone Orchestra -

Tuesday: Science & Film
Tuesday: Science & Film
Why Does Society Need Science?
10:00 - 10:15
Why Does Society Need Science?

Science has always been a driver of progress. But, as global challenges prove increasingly complex, scientists must embrace their own social responsibility to seek out solutions and redefine progress itself, as a means to not just advance, but secure the future of human civilization.

Speaker: Vincent Hendricks, Professor of Formal Philosophy, Center for Information and Bubble Studies University, Denmark

Why Science Film, Why Now?
10:15 - 10:30
Why Science Film, Why Now?

When science and media merge, their union is complex and their progression nonlinear. Film, education, public engagement, science journalism and storytelling all have variable approaches to interpreting and translating science. A larger question remains: why is science media important?

Speaker: Nadja Oertelt, Scientist & Digital Media Producer, co-founder of Massive, NYC, USA

The Pyramid Experiment: Core Needs and Expectations
10:30 - 11:30
The Pyramid Experiment: Core Needs and Expectations

Should science film educate, alert or inspire? A three-stage group work session exploring the needs of audiences, scientists and filmmakers as we broach issues at the heart of the cinema-science relationship.

Ethics, Integrity, Accuracy in Science Film
11:30 - 12:00
Ethics, Integrity, Accuracy in Science Film

Based on a decade-long exploration of science and philosophy that gave birth to an engaging film trilogy, this ignite talk will explore the labels, hierarchies and ethical challenges that come with working through knowledge claims between the fields of science and art.

Speaker: Phie Ambo Documentary Filmmaker, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Narratives in Science Storytelling
12:00 - 13:00
Narratives in Science Storytelling

3 parallel workshops on key aspects of bringing science to life on film.

Filmmakers often mistakenly consider science too rigid for dramatic narratives. Using case studies from science documentaries and from mainstream fictional films, this workshop investigates the ways in which filmmakers have successfully utilized science in order to tell gripping stories.

Speakers
David A. Kirby, Senior Lecturer in Science Communication Studies, University of Manchester, Director of the Science and Entertainment Lab, Manchester, UK.
Lomax Boyd, PhD Researcher and Creative Technologist, Science Education Fellow at Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Washington DC, USA.

Aesthetics
12:00 - 13:00
Aesthetics

3 parallel workshops on key aspects of bringing science to life on film.

How can we translate science into film and art? It's not enough to simply use a diagram or throw a scientist on camera. We'll look at 5 powerful methods to inspire audiences with science, backed by research and examples. Get ready to roll up your sleeves in this highly interactive workshop!

Speaker: Amanda Phingbodhipakkiya, Creative Director and TED Resident, Founder and CEO of The Leading Strand, NYC, USA

Creative Collaboration for Science Cinema
12:00 - 13:00
Creative Collaboration for Science Cinema

3 parallel workshops on key aspects of bringing science to life on film.

Is ‘solving real problems for real people’ something we as scientists and artists should do in collaboration? This workshop will introduce collaborative methods combining research and documentary, and reflect on opportunities and obstacles for future interdisciplinary collaboration.

The Collaboratorium
Kristian Martiny, PhD Head of Psychological and Social Research, Elsass Institute Postdoc, Co-Founder and Director of The Collaboratorium, Copenhagen, Denmark
Alfred Birkegaard, PhD Co-founder and Leader, Open Media Lab, Roskilde University, Co-Founder of The Collaboratorium, Copenhagen, Denmark
Daniel Oxenhandler

Lunch Break
13:00 - 14:00
Lunch Break

Morning Recap
14:00 - 14:15
Morning Recap

Workshop leaders return to the stage together to recap and review the ideas and discussions explored so far.

Production & Tools
14:15 - 14:35
Production & Tools

A rapidfire set of talks to dive into new opportunities for science cinema.

Virtual reality, interactive storytelling, simulated worlds: new media technologies have great potential for communicating science. How can we bring these tools thoughtfully into our work and production process? Learn tools, production approaches, and case studies for immersive media.

Speaker: Ainsley Sutherland CEO, Virtual Collaboration Research, Cambridge, USA.

Platforms & Distribution
14:35 - 15:05
Platforms & Distribution

A rapidfire set of talks to dive into new opportunities for science cinema.

Popular science web videos are on the rise, though not all of them are held to the high standards of journalism. It’s time publishers and specialized agencies stepped up to act as a trusted source of factual content, growing their business while growing their partners and audience too.

Speaker: Thilo Körkel, Editor Physics/Astronomy at Spektrum der Wissenschaft, Coordinator at SciViews.de Video, Germany

Interactive media, hybrid storytelling and accessibility to raw data are vital to our communication and appreciation of science. How can we use these to inspire a new wave of science fans? Discover new tools, distribution platforms and production methods for immersive experiences in science cinema.

Speaker: Alexis Gambis CEO and Founder of Labocine, Executive Director & Founder of Imagine Science Films, USA

Funding & Initiatives
15:05 - 15:25
Funding & Initiatives

A rapidfire set of talks to dive into new opportunities for science cinema.

How do you develop your innovative film about science and the human condition? What are the key challenges? This lightning talk will outline opportunities for support from Wellcome and other funders to create award winning films to connect wider audiences with science.

Speaker: Lucy McDowell, Factual Development Manager, Wellcome, UK.

Q&A with Lightning Talk Speakers
15:25 - 15:40
Q&A with Lightning Talk Speakers

Moderation: AC Coppens

Coffee Break
15:40 - 16:00
Coffee Break

The DNA of Great Science Films
16:00 - 16:45
The DNA of Great Science Films

From Jean Painlevé filming a male seahorse giving birth, to Nicolas Roeg’s Marilyn Monroe demonstrating the theory of relativity, to Isabella Rossellini portraying a sexy shrimp, this talk sheds light on the creative synthesis of scientific ideas from the advent of the moving image to the present.

Speaker: Sonia Epstein, Executive Editor, Museum of the Moving Image, USA.

Toolkit to Go!
16:45 - 17:15
Toolkit to Go!

This session offers participants recommendations, actionable advice and resources to help them jumpstart their next creative endeavour at the intersection of science and film, exploring questions of genre, audiences, funding, collaboration with science advisors, accuracy and ethics.

Speaker: Amy C. Chambers Science communication and Screen Studies scholar, Newcastle University, UK.

What's Next?
17:15 - 17:30
What's Next?

Where are we at now? What’s next? Wrapping up the day’s work with key final insights to keep science film moving forward.

Speaker: Nadja Oertelt, Scientist & Digital Media Producer, co-founder of Massive, USA

Wednesday: Serialized
Wednesday: Serialized
Serialized: Opportunities & Challenges
10:00 - 10:30
Serialized: Opportunities & Challenges

For the occasion of this Serialized day, curator Thom Powers interviewed leading filmmakers and distributors in Europe and North America to examine the opportunities and challenges in the growing market for serialized stories. In this keynote, he reveals what he learned.

Speaker: Thom Powers, Artistic Director DOC NYC; Documentary Programmer TIFF & Curator for the SVOD platform Sundance Now, USA

In-Depth with Editors
10:30 - 11:30
In-Depth with Editors

Editors Richard Hankin (The Jinx) and Mary Manhardt (Making a Murderer) worked on two of the highest profile serialized crime stories of the decade. In this conversation, they discuss the challenges of shaping a narrative across multiple episodes.

Speakers: Richard Hankin, Editor, Looking Glass Films, USA
Mary Manhardt, Documentary Film Editor, USA


Chair: Thom Powers, Artistic Director DOC NYC; Documentary Programmer TIFF & Curator for the SVOD platform Sundance Now, USA

How to Write for Series
11:30 - 12:15
How to Write for Series

The Scandinavian Star disaster has been researched by investigative journalist Lars Halskov for 10 years. How to go from this extensive material to an epic story with a large gallery of complex characters? Director Mikala Krogh is going to explore that together with Lars Halskov and one of the strongest fiction scriptwriters of the Nordic Noir wave, Nikolaj Scherfig. We will have a look into the engine.

Speakers:
Mikala Krogh, Director, Denmark
Nikolaj Scherfig, Scriptwriter, Denmark
Lars Halskov, Journalist, Denmark

Serialized Podcast
12:15 - 13:00
Serialized Podcast

Podcasting has shifted from niche listening to a substantial business with shows like “Serial” and “Startup.” Nicholas Quah is the founder of Hot Pod, the must-read newsletter about the podcast industry. He talks to Thom Powers, host of the Pure Nonfiction podcast, about rising trends and opportunities for crossover between filmmaking and podcasting.

Speaker: Nicholas Quah, Founder of Hot Pod, USA
Chair: Thom Powers, Artistic Director DOC NYC; Documentary Programmer TIFF & Curator for the SVOD platform Sundance Now, USA

Lunch Break
13:00 - 14:00
Lunch Break

Marketplace for Shortform
14:00 - 14:30
Marketplace for Shortform

The marketplace for short documentaries has swiftly grown as digital platforms crave content in small doses. Charlotte Cook, a co-founder of Field of Vision with Laura Poitras and AJ Schnack, talks about the new terrain for serialized shorts like “The Journey,” a series on Syrian refugees, that FoV distributed with The New Yorker.

Speaker: Charlotte Cook, Co-founder of Field of Vision, USA
Chair: Thom Powers, Artistic Director DOC NYC; Documentary Programmer TIFF & Curator for the SVOD platform Sundance Now, USA

Case Study: Long Strange Trip
14:30 - 15:15
Case Study: Long Strange Trip

The Grateful Dead band was known for its long jam sessions and cult-like following. Director Amir Bar-Lev seeks to reach the uninitiated with an epic film, divided into 6 parts. In this conversation, Bar-Lev discusses how he paced the story and sought to use the long format to create complicated characters.

Speaker: Amir Bar-Lev, Director, USA
Chair: Thom Powers, Artistic Director DOC NYC; Documentary Programmer TIFF & Curator for the SVOD platform Sundance Now, USA

Case Study: The Quatraro Mystery
15:15 - 16:00
Case Study: The Quatraro Mystery

Mads Brügger ("The Red Chapel") discusses his work crafting feature length documentaries and multi-part series out of the same content. His latest project, playing at CPH:DOX, is “The John Dalli Mystery” that draws upon the material from his series “The Quartraro Mystery.”

Speaker: Mads Brügger, Documentary Director & Programme Director, Radio 24 Syv, Denmark
Chair: Thom Powers, Artistic Director DOC NYC; Documentary Programmer TIFF & Curator for the SVOD platform Sundance Now, USA

Coffee Break
16:00 - 16:30
Coffee Break

In Conversation with: Ezra Edelman
16:30 - 17:30
In Conversation with: Ezra Edelman

In his Oscar-nominated, 7 ½ hour epic “OJ: Made in America,” director Ezra Edelman took an overexposed crime story and reframed it as a stirring look at race in America. In this conversation, Edelman discusses the process of keeping an audience on the edge of their seat through a story that many thought they already knew.

Chair:
Thom Powers, Artistic Director DOC NYC; Documentary Programmer TIFF & Curator for the SVOD platform Sundance Now, USA

Speaker:
Ezra Edelman, Director, USA

Thursday: The Art of Impact
Thursday: The Art of Impact
The New Impact
10:00 - 10:30
The New Impact

‘Impact’ used to be a dirty word in the film community. Not any more. Beadie Finzi who runs the Good Pitch programme, reflects on the new generation of filmmakers and Impact Producers getting serious not only about making media that matters, but making sure it reaches the audiences that count. In a time of rising political and social instability, of growing distrust in the media - never has the role of these storytellers been more important.

Speaker: Beadie Finzi, Foundation Director, BRITDOC, UK

Impact Distribution Strategy: Round 1
10:30 - 11:15
Impact Distribution Strategy: Round 1

What is your impact distribution campaign goal: Reach, Revenue or Reaction? Trying to secure funds, but not sure how to present your ideas? Join us to create a strategy live - including audience ideas - for a film screening in the festival. Round 1 kicks of with Issue Context, Impact Objectives, Target Audience, Outcomes, Strategic Partners and Scheduling.

Chair: Sarah Mosses, CEO, Together Films, UK
Speakers: Rebecca Ashdown, Impact Producer, Together Films, UK
Clint Beharry, Freelance Strategist, USA

Coffee Break
11:15 - 11:45
Coffee Break

Impact Distribution Strategy: Round 2
11:45 - 12:30
Impact Distribution Strategy: Round 2

Refine your strategic ideas to impress new impact campaign funders. Get clarity on what is possible and what isn’t by reviewing the bigger Impact Distribution Campaign plans in Round 2, which includes: Platform Strategy, Comms & PR, Web & Social and then the all important BUDGET, FUNDERS and EVALUATION. Best results for those who have also attended the morning session!

Chair: Sarah Mosses, CEO, Together Films, UK
Speakers: Rebecca Ashdown, Impact Producer, Together Films, UK
Clint Beharry, Freelance Strategist, USA

Highs and Lows of Campaigning
12:30 - 13:00
Highs and Lows of Campaigning

What is it really like to be in charge of a release strategy that can have real world consequences? What does a typical day look like for an Impact Producer? How do you get paid? What is the biggest mistake that people have made when starting out? Join us for a frank, honest, and funny conversation with leading impact producers about their new role.

Chair: Sarah Mosses CEO, Together Films, UK
Speaker: Elhum Shakerifar, Producer, Postcode Films, UK
Abigail Anketell-Jones, Impact Producer, Violet Films, UK

Lunch Break
13:00 - 14:00
Lunch Break

The Impact of Art
14:00 - 14:45
The Impact of Art

As a leading documentary funder, how does Sundance balance the desire for creative excellence with the desire to inspire action? How have they seen the narrative form adapting over recent years? Tabitha Jackson pulls back the curtain on recent grantee decisions to uncover what inspires her about her slate, and the power of art to have impact.

Chair: Cecilia Lidin, Documentary Consultant, The Danish Film Institute, Denmark
Speakers: Tabitha Jackson, Director, Sundance Institute, USA

Before The Flood. National Geographic’s Bold Impact Case Study
14:45 - 15:45
Before The Flood. National Geographic’s Bold Impact Case Study

Before The Flood in which Leonardo DiCaprio explores the topic of climate change was seen by more than 60 million people in the first week of release. How did they do it? By crafting an innovative release strategy combining a global simultaneous broadcast and free streaming towards a dedicated release date. Hear directly from those in charge of the acquisition and release about their ambitious plans and staggering results.

Tim Pastore President of Original Programming and Production at National Geographic Channel, NY, USA
Chris Albert EVP, Global Communications & Talent Relations: National Geographic Channel, Nat Geo WILD, National Geographic, Washington, USA

Coffee Break
15:45 - 16:15
Coffee Break

Cash, Audience and Insight. How Brands Can Help Fuel Social Change.
16:15 - 17:30
Cash, Audience and Insight. How Brands Can Help Fuel Social Change.

Brands and the commercial universe have the potential to transform how your stories can come to life. When public funding is drying up, brands are providing a lot more than just cash. From audience insights, marketing strategy to helping boost production values and providing long-term support for causes, could you consider a new kind of partnership?

Chair: Ravi Amaratunga Hitchcock, Head of Content, We Are Pi, The Netherlands
Speakers: Leila Fataar, Head of Culture and Entertainment for Diageo, UK Tala Derki, Director, “Return To Homs” and “Ode to Lesvos”, Syria/Germany
Rob Alderson, VP Content, Editor-in-Chief at WeTransfer

Cash, Audience and Insight. How Brands Can Help Fuel Social Change.
16:15 - 17:30
Cash, Audience and Insight. How Brands Can Help Fuel Social Change.

Brands and the commercial universe have the potential to transform how your stories can come to life. When public funding is drying up, brands are providing a lot more than just cash. From audience insights, marketing strategy to helping boost production values and providing long-term support for causes, could you consider a new kind of partnership?

Chair: Ravi Amaratunga Hitchcock, Head of Content, We Are Pi, The Netherlands
Speakers: Leila Fataar, Head of Culture and Entertainment for Diageo, UK
Talal Derki, Director, “Return To Homs” and “Ode to Lesvos”, Syria/Germany
Rob Alderson, VP Content, Editor-in-Chief at WeTransfer

Friday: Art:Film
Friday: Art:Film
Mysteries of Animal Conciousness
10:00 - 11:00
Mysteries of Animal Conciousness

Phillip Warnell’s Ming of Harlem, is a film about a man who kept a tiger and an alligator in his Harlem apartment. It will be the point of departure for a discussion about the “natural world” as a separate or different world, our relationship with animals, and animals’ experience of reality.

Speakers: Phillip Warnell, UK
Dr. Louise Whiteley, Denmark

Art, Post-truth and Reality
11:00 - 12:00
Art, Post-truth and Reality

Yael Bartana’s films, installations and photographs explore the imagery of identity and the politics of memory. The key phrase of Yael Bartana’s film Trilogy ‘and Europe will be stunned’ will be the jumping-off point for a discussion about history and truth, alternate realities and the role of the artist in challenging subverting perceived political, ideological and historical truths.

Speaker: Yael Bartana, Artist, Israel, Germany, The Netherlands
Dr. Roger Cook, Art Historian, UK

Lunch Break
12:00 - 13:00
Lunch Break

Between Reality and Hallucination
13:00 - 16:00
Between Reality and Hallucination

Master Class with artists Iain Forsyth & Jane Pollard, Directors of 20,000 Days on Earth, featuring Nick Cave. Working at the intersection of art and film, their work is collected by museums worldwide. Producer and Curator Jacqui Davies will discuss their work, which crosses the illusion of cinema with the presence of theatre, conjuring a psychological, conceptual and physical state between reality and hallucination. The masterclass is organized in collaboration with the Post Graduate Training Dept. at the Danish Film School.

Speaker: Jacqui Davies, Producer & Curator, Jacqui Davies Ltd., UK
Chair: Iain Forsyth & Jane Pollard, Artists and FIlmmakers, UK

Welcome Too Late
13:00 - 14:00
Welcome Too Late

When everything from climate to technology is changing at accelerating pace, it’s increasingly difficult to keep up. The future undercuts the present and the present recedes into the past at ever greater speed. Curator Toke Lykkeberg, talks about the themes and ideas around his Kunsthal Charlottenburg group exhibition: Welcome Too Late.

Chair:
Toke Lykkeberg, Curator, Denmark

Speaker:
Tue Greenfort, Artist, Germany

CPH:CONFERENCE

CPH:CONFERENCE is presented in partnership with:

Art, Technology and Change is organized in collaboration with:

Art:Film Masterclass is organized in collaboration with: